Old Soul Raised Right

The door is open letting a breeze blow into the house. Birds are singing. Alabama, Alan Jackson, and others are singing in the background of the sound of dishes being washed while coffee cake bakes in the oven.

I’ve been told before I have an old soul in a young body. I think I was just raised right – simple, appreciative, well-mannered.

As I mixed that coffee cake, I chuckled to myself. I was using my grandma’s KitchenAid mixer, Tupperware measuring utensils while other Tupperware pieces dried in the dish rack, and the recipe used is from my copy of the “big red cookbook” from which many recipes of my childhood came as my mama followed and tweaked the recipes in her copy of that cookbook given to her by her mama.

I should be used to it by now, but I am still shocked when I hear my friends say they don’t cook or when they say their girlfriends or ex-girls never baked for them. Most Saturdays, after chores were finished, the kitchen became mine as I baked cookies or cakes or some other (usually) tasty treat for my family! I was raised by a mama who loves to cook for anyone and everyone! I have that same mindset. It makes me happy to cook for family and friends and co-workers and people I’ve never met.

It truly makes me sad to hear that my age group and those younger than I no longer take pride in their ability to throw a meal together for unexpected company or no longer have a cake or bread on stand-by. Ice tea in the fridge? Nope.

(Sidenote: I’m excited to be getting a new Tupperware pitcher! It will probably be tea-stained by the end of the summer!)

I don’t know if I’m just an old soul in a young body and not up to modern behaviour or if people these days just aren’t raising their kids right – with manners and preparedness -, but as I listen to the ballads of Brad Paisley and smell the cinnamon in the coffee cake heating up, I’m content.

 

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Things Not to Tell a Single Lady

I am in my mid-twenties and still single. Let me tell you, there are several that we’re getting tired of hearing.

  1. Your time is not God’s time.
    Clearly, if we’re a Christian, we know this. That doesn’t make it easier. You also don’t know if it’s actually God’s plan for the poor girl to get married. That’s called false assurance and is bad. There are plenty of single women in the Bible.
  2. Maybe God just knows you’re not ready to get married yet. Maybe you have more to learn.
    Thank you for pointing out that everyone else recognizes that my life is currently a wreck, and it’s not just in my head. Here’s the thing. I know I’m not necessarily ready to get married in the fact that I have nothing to bring to the marriage beside more loans. I also know that the chance of me finding a man who actually wants to marry me after less than a year of dating is slim to none, so that gives me a year to get my life in order before I’m paying for a wedding and now taking care of a second human hopefully followed by more mini-humans.
    But, I’ve spent my entire life watching my parents. Whenever one of them had a rough day, as soon as the other got home, they give each other a hug, tell me to shut up and go away for a few minutes so they can talk about their day, my mum would go thunk into my daddy’s chest, and then they would fix it or at the very least be able to hold each other up until they fixed whatever was wrong.
    I want to be able to go home to a husband and go thunk into his chest after a long, troublesome day. Or I want a boyfriend I can call after that day who yes, will probably laugh at me, or be playing a computer game while talking to me, but at least he would be mine to call. Then, being a male, he would probably call me back several hours later with ideas after his one track mind has pondered it a bit more.
  3. You’re young; you’ve got time for a husband and kids.
    How do you know? I don’t know the status of my maternal, biological clock, so how on earth do you? How do you know my dreams? Unless you’re in my family or a close friend or somebody I felt like shocking by telling you I want 6 kids, you don’t know. Yeah, I’m not one of those modern, American women who only want 2 kids; I have wanted to have 6 kiddos of my own my entire life! I also don’t want to be pregnant til I’m 40 and then have no chance of seeing my great grandbabies. I want to have at least one year of my marriage of not being pregnant or with mini-mes crawling around. Unless we’re given twins, I’ve already said good-bye to two of my dream babies.
  4. Keep your standards high!
    Well no kidding. If I was willing to lower my standards, they would have been lowered before the 2 youngest of my 6 imaginary babies vanished, and I’d be married by now. Rough years would probably be ahead, but I’d be married.
  5. Quit looking; when the time is right, he’ll find you.
    Mmmm….I’m not so sure the potential husband of mine is not stuck in a treestand somewhere. While I 100% believe that the man is to be the head of the relationship which includes being the one to ask me out – not vice versa regardless of the times and trends – I also think that giving him a little push, like maybe make him a batch of cookies or something, might be necessary. Put the idea in his head.

So, while I know that most people who are already happily in a relationship or just got out of a relationship and don’t sympathize have these 5 common phrases at the ready for those of us who actually want to get married and have kiddos someday, we’re getting kinda tired of hearing them – especially from ourselves as we try to convince ourselves that no, we’re not going to die alone and leave our nephews/nieces as our heirs.

Time of my Life…

I’ve been reading through a book about the names of God in the Bible for a couple months now. The book should have been done in one month, but, for possibly the first time in my life, I’m not just reading through this devotional book to complete it. I’m actually reading through it to learn about my God.

Last week, I was attempting to understand – and, please note, I’m chuckling to myself as I write that – Adonai. As I was reading through the chapter on that description of God, I was growling to myself about how it was poorly written. Why on earth would the writer throw Adon into the chapter without explaining the difference between Adon and Adonai? I don’t really understand what this verse has to do with this name…and so on.

Then I quit growling with one more thought: Maybe I’m having trouble understanding the qualities and nature of God we can know through this name because I have not yet had to call on God using this name.

When I first originally started this study several years ago before getting distracted and feeling the need to begin it anew, El Roi – the God Who Sees – was the name that jumped out at me. That is the name that I have used quite often in my personal conversations with God when I don’t understand what’s happening in my life, in the world, in my family, etc. I’ve called on the God Who Sees, a quality first made known in the life and account of Hagar.

Most everyone who has grown up in church or attended a Christian school for any number of years has likely heard of the Jefferson Bible. Thomas Jefferson reportedly butchered his Bible, cutting out verses or passages that he did not like or with which he did not agree. I am by NO means advocating such actions. When you choose to place your faith and hope in the Holy God, you don’t get to pick and choose which words of God apply to you. They all do; every word has a truth, a lesson, a challenge, a command by which you must live.

However. Just like my daddy has different ways of communicating, disciplining, teaching myself and my siblings, I can’t help but think that God started that method. Make no mistake: when God says via inspiration of the writers that something is wrong, He means it’s wrong for everybody. There should not be any debate or question about that. But most people have a verse they may call their “life verse” or just their favorite, a verse that challenges or encourages them, a verse that seems to speak to them more than others. Mine is Proverbs 24:10 followed by Ephesians 4:1. My favorite book of the Bible is the book of Proverbs.

Listening to a podcast of my favorite pastor to whom I listen, he mentions that growing up, he would much rather read through the book of Revelation than the book of Proverbs. I was the exact opposite. I still dislike reading through Revelation. Love the book of Proverbs. I read through that book and am challenged with how I should be living, behaving.

Going back to the study on the names of God. For whatever reason, El Roi and El Shaddai (essentially, the Provider or the God Who Provides) are two of the names of God which I use when I call upon Him for anything, even just regular conversation. I have no problem or struggle recognizing Him as Adonai, Lord or Master. I have not had any problem standing strong when more or less telling a former employer, “no, I serve and obey God; I’m not doing this” when they wanted me to follow their (unwritten) policies that clearly compromised what we as Christians have been instructed to do regardless of how major or minor it might appear. I just struggle with need or occasion to call on Him with that name.

I call my dad “daddy” whereas my brother and sister use “dad.” My brother occasionally calls him “pops” just like he called his dad at different times. Maybe, just as everyone is challenged differently or is taught differently by different passages of Scripture, everyone goes to their heavenly Father with a different name based on where they are in their spiritual life. It makes sense, to me at least.

Forgotten History

February in the United States is Black History Month. I do not care either way about if it’s fair or needed or whatever. However. I do have a MAJOR pet peeve about the month though: Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, apparently Oprah, and Rosa Parks are the only famous Americans of African descent who are discussed and quoted!

Harriet Tubman used to be a big name during this month, but her name is slowly falling out of conversation as time passes.

A co-worker of mine reminds us daily that we should be celebrating all this month. The leaders of the workplace have been humoring him with our morning, motivational quote (whole different post I could write on that) being from MLK and Booker T. Washington. This co-worker was going on about how we all could stand to study these greats a bit more and how America would not be the same without them.

Guess whose favorite genres of books have always been historical fiction and non-fiction? That is correct. Yours truly. I decided to give him daily quizzes.

The first: Who was Phyllis Wheatley? Nobody knew. The Answer? She was a brilliant African woman who was stolen from her people and sold into slavery before she turned ten years old. She was sold in the British colonies of North America where her “family” recognized her intelligence and gave her an education which emphasized literature and history far above even what the daughters of most colonists were given. She was a poet. Unfortunately, with the dominance of the slavery in the colonies at that time, her work was not overly welcome. Her family took her to England where she and her work was well-received clearing the path for her to return to success in the colonies, which began to fight for their freedom from Britain. She was freed and continued to write and be close to the family who encouraged this African girl who chose to embrace her circumstances and her new country, the United States of America, until she married another free-man who unfortunately ruined her life and led to her death and the death of their children. Nobody talks about her anymore.

Next I asked about Crispus Attucks. Nobody knew. The first death in the War for Independence of the colonies, of the United States, and nobody remembers him. Nobody remembers that the first death in the Revolutionary War was actually a free-man (granted, that was because he was a runaway slave) with good business sense and worth ethic. MLK praised him for his role in American history, in the founding and fight for America’s freedom.

I don’t have a problem with people remembering and recognizing the importance of MLK and the others mentioned at the beginning of this post because they are more recent. There are still people who remember being a part of their influence on current events. However, don’t completely disregard or discard the importance of those who came before any of us or any of our great-grandparents were alive. Those are the people who paved the way for the recent figures. There were four other men, white men, killed with Crispus Attucks. They were all buried together. The British soldiers who killed the men were taken to trial for the deaths of all five men. The final straw that led to the Revolution, the birth of America started with the death of a black man who died alongside his white, brother sailors. How is that fact so forgotten?

Americans have forgotten their history. It is time to learn again and remember.

Sunday School

This morning, while getting ready for church, I wrote a – in my opinion – brilliant post in my head about slavery. I was super pumped to type it out here.

At church, while watching a video about the sanctity of life, I started writing a post, again in my head, about individual world-views. I was excited about.

After church, ran into my parents in town for lunch where we started discussing Sunday school.

Background: I grew up in a church that was quite sizable. Children’s Sunday school was divided by school grade and age. Youth group was youth group, 7th-12th grade. College and Career was essentially everyone out of high school into their late 20s/early 30s. After that, I’m not entirely sure on all the different classes. I know there was a class titled “Homebuilders.” You picked which class you wanted to attend. (You could pick right out of high school, maybe in senior high too, but most chose to go with age we transitioned from kid to adult.)

Back to today: The question was brought up: do churches need or should have a college and career aged Sunday school class? Why can’t the young adults join the older adults in a group Sunday school?

My thoughts: Yes. Here’s why.

  1. If all the adults are sitting in the same area being taught the same lesson, how is that any different than the main church service? Especially in smaller churches?
  2. Sunday school classes typically have more interaction when smaller. A quieter person might be able to work up the courage to give their thoughts on a topic or passage of Scripture when there are only their peers in the room but remain silent when faced with talking in front of “older” Christians are adults they’ve grown up listening to in church.
  3. Graduating high school can be overwhelming to a teenager; why have that stress or overwhelming feeling at church too? A college and/or career class allows that teenager to transition from high school to adulthood a bit easier. They can learn with their peers facing the same struggles or those who have recently gone through the same struggles – budgeting, relationships, new co-workers – how to handle those specific challenges Biblically in comparison to sitting through a lesson on how to handle disciplining young children according to the Bible and trying to focus on that instead of their new trials.
  4. Sunday school does not take the place of morning worship service, evening worship service, or Wednesday night prayer meeting. Those are all still combined – all ages – when the younger adults fellowship with other believers across the range of ages.
  5. New members or those visiting a church for the first time might feel more at ease with their own age group, be less concerned about what that senior saint is thinking about them, and actually focus on the lesson.

I realize the college group could hold Bible studies apart from church, but, in my experience, those studies are sporadically attended by this age group due to work and school schedules.

These are just the reasons I could think of today for why churches shouldn’t dismiss the idea of a college/career group. I’m sure I will think of more over the next few days. Feel free to comment your thoughts on the subject!

Why I Wish You a Merry Christmas

“Happy Holidays” is becoming the only greeting you hear at Christmas. A lot of people whine or mutter about how political correctness is taking over everything including the holidays – yes, I am one of those people – but that’s not why that phrase upsets me.

It is so impersonal!

When I wish someone “Merry Christmas,” I am inviting them to enjoy a holiday I celebrate and love! I don’t get offended when someone tells me “Happy Hanukkah” because that is them extending the specialty of their holiday to me to enjoy!

Hearing “Happy Holidays” tells me that person does not truly care about what or how they are celebrating this year, and they certainly do not care about my celebrations. Happy Holidays is a phrase that can be used any time of year during any holiday season – late winter, spring, summer, etc. The phrase is so general it is almost irrelevant to say.

I actually had this discussion with a co-worker the other night who agreed my reasoning makes total sense. We then began wishing everyone a “Merry Christmas” with positive results. Many people returned the Merry Christmas while others thanked us and wished us Happy Kwanza or Hanukkah or a holiday special to them which I have no idea what it is or can even begin to try to spell! Nobody was offended.

To summarize: I tell people “Merry Christmas” because I want to include everybody in my favorite time of year. I don’t get offended or put off when somebody wishes me the best for their holiday because they are including me in their special time of year.

The God of Fire

If you never have an imaginary conversation or attempted to plan a conversation with someone in your head, you are lying to yourself. Tonight, my conversation was with someone I love dearly who is now unfortunately brainwashed by a treehugger and with the idiotic treehugger/brainwasher.

At some point, this conversation turned to the world being destroyed by fire by God after the rapture and tribulations and the rest of the prophecies in Revelations. The idiot, in my imaginary conversation, asked how I can I follow a God Who will allow the world to be destroyed. I answered with He is the just God who has had literally billions of His children, throughout history, suffer unimaginable pain and death for their attempts at warning people of the upcoming judgment. The idiot then asked how would I be able to stand seeing the world be destroyed.

I, being me, responded that since I will be seated on the stoop of my personalized mansion, safe from the power of destruction of the fire, I don’t anticipate mourning the destruction of a cursed world. I also pointed out that as a pyro and a firefighter, I love fire. I love watching the beauty of the dancing flames and listening to sound of the fire consuming the fuel.

That got me thinking away from the treehuggers about how appropriate it was that God, the Creator of the universe, will destroy the universe – cursed but still beautiful – with something as beautiful as fire. Fire is the element that with restraint is beautiful and beneficial. Fire is also the element that, when unleashed, is powerful beyond belief and can continue to consume everything that stands in defiance of that power. From there, how appropriate that God appeared as a pillar of fire to guide the Israelites through the wilderness.

He created this universe out of NOTHING. I’m redoing my house right, slowly, so very slowly, but surely. I can have a perfect design in my head, but only based on what I have with which to work. I can draw out my dream house, but only based on what I’ve already seen. Architects can design a new house, but they have to be within codes and regulations based on what has already been done. God designed the world with no previous worlds (that we’ve been told), and it is beautiful even while cursed! Clearly, He has a respect, knowledge, and love of beauty – including in fire.

He also appeared before them as the element that can consume forests and towns and civilizations – as we were reminded recently with Gatlinburg, Tennessee – before it stops or is stopped. The power of fire is uncontested world-wide. Israel was overtaken by fires and aided by other countries who realized the amount of destruction – and the threat to them – of those fires. What better element would the just, powerful, and holy God choose than the purifying fire? Oh yes, fire purifies.

It is truly sad the amount of death in Tennessee right now – people, woods, and animals. However, that area will come back to be even more beautiful and full of life after the impurities have been burned away. Farmers burn away left-over crops and weeds to clean and enrich the soil for a better harvest. We are told a couple different times in the Bible that Christians are being purified through trials the same way fire purifies. The holy God cannot allow sin in His kingdom. When He creates the new world, it will be after the impurities of this world have been burned away.

Yes, I realize God appears as wind or rather a gentle breeze in Biblical accounts as well, but this line of thought focused on the fire and the different characteristics of God we can see through fire.

The last thing we can see through the account of God being the pillar of fire guiding the Israelites: mercy. They were wandering because of their sin. That fire could have been used to consume the entire nation, but God restrained from doing that because while they were wandering as consequence for their sin, they were wandering because God showed mercy and allowed them to live to wander rather than choosing a different people to be His.